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Today is Tuesday, July 22, 2014


9 tips on how to use your new state health insurance exchange

Millions of insured, underinsured and uninsured Americans are being told by President Obama to sign up for very expensive health insurance plans that will be offered on states' health insurance exchanges beginning Oct. 1.

As expected, newspapers, magazines, broadcasters and cable TV networks are trying to win some new readers and viewers by offering advice on how to use the exchanges and how to pick the health insurance plan that will be best for them.  Most of them are and will be misleading consumers.

My suggestions, which are based on years of blogging against and about ObamaCare and reading numerous articles and comments about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), follow:

1. Exchanges probably will give more choices of insurers in urban markets than in rural markets where only one insurer may be available. That could make rural insurers more expensive.

 

2. You will have a choice of deductible plans. Chose a plan that involves deductibles and copays that you can pay off in a year or so at your current income.

 

3. Many state insurance exchanges won't be fully functional on Oct. 1, and nobody can predict when they will be bug free and give you accurate price quotes on your premiums, copays and deductibles. 

 

4. Health insurance brokers and people certified as "navigators' will be as intimidated by ObamaCare as you are. Don't rush to signup. Give the exchanges, brokers and "navigators" time to learn at the expense of other people.

 

5. While the government is inviting you to lie on your applications about your income and other variables, remember that sooner or later the IRS will come after you. Violating federal laws is a big deal.

 

6. Don't believe much of what you see and hear on ABC, NBC, CBS or CNN. They are in the business of selling ObamaCare and making Obama look good. They're serving Obama, not you. The article published recently by WSJ.com shows the same kind of pro-ObamaCare optimism that should be taken with huge grains of salt.

 

7. Carefully calculate whether you can go wiithout ObamaCare insurance until you have a catastrophic financial loss due to a sickness or accident. Enrollment periods last only six months. That could mean that if you need insurance outside the enrollment period, you won't be able to buy it when you need your free lunch.

 

8. ObamaCare covers a lot of worthless preventive care and wellness care services for the worried well. The literature warns that such services too often give false positives and result in unnecessary procedures that could do more harm than good. But if you have pre-existing conditions that require wellness or preventive care services, use them. See my previous post.

 

9. If your health insurance premiums and deductibles seem unaffordable, Obama will be happy to see you stop smoking, skipping your daily Starbucks, canceling your health club and cable TV contracts and keeping your old vehicles for four or five more years than you otherwise would. And you really don't have to buy that new home, appliance, smart phone, computer or mattress.

 

LINKS:

 

State insurance exchange blind spots: Unknown risks and unintened consequences, by Seth Kneller. The Health Care Blog.

 

Will ObamaCare Survive? Nine key questions, by Robert Lazewski. The Health Care Blog.


Wellness programs are being exposed as big time and money wasters

Al Lewis and Vik Khanna write on The Health Care Blog that corporate wellness programs imposed by clueless CEOs and personell departments have been huge time and money wasters. 

LINKS:

The Summer of Wellness's Discontent, by Al Lewis & Vik Khanna, The Health Care Blog.

Preventive care, cancer screenings are costly and can hurt more people than they help, by Donald E. L. Johnson, The Business Word.


10 fixes for ObamaCare; Speaker Boehner has to get real

House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) should include the 10 fixes for ObamaCare in the bill that he announced he will have the House vote on next week.

If the House bill doesn't include fixes for ObamaCare that are being demanded by both Republicans and Democrats, it's a political fraud.


1. Remove provisions that give DHHS the power to give special treatments to unions and other Obama Democrats, the power to dictate insurance premiums and premium increases and the power to manipulate health insurance benefit designs.

2. Remove provisions that are causing employers to shorten work weeks to less than 30 hours and keep their payrolls under 50 people.

3. Remove mandated benefits that make ObamaCare plans unaffordable for all but those who will be subsidized by the federal government.

4. Remove the "death panels" that will decide without political review what will be covered and what won't be under ObamaCare.

5. Ban state laws that will make it unlawful for small and large companies and unions' Taft Hartley plans to self insure and buy stop loss reinsurance.

6. Remove the corrupt IRS from the role of enforcing ObamaCare rules.

7. Remove all pork that makes ObamaCare a multi-trillion dollar loser. The real positive provisions in ObamaCare can be implemented for less than $20 billions, not trillions.

8. Remove all provisions that fund immoral, unethical and dishonest government promotions of ObamaCare to clueless consumers.

9. Remove funding for worthless wellness and preventive care programs.

10. Remove the 37 new government agencies that are created under ObamaCare.


Walgreen will send employees to private health exchanges for health insurance

The Wall Street Journal reports that Walgreen will put its 160,000 employes on private health insurance exchanges where they'll be able to shop the offerings of several regional and national health insurers. The Journal reports:

Under Walgreen's new arrangement, to take effect in 2014, the firm will pay a fixed amount for employees to select coverage options in a private insurance exchange run by Aon Hewitt, a consulting unit of Aon PLC. The exchange will offer up to 25 different plans in some states.

 
That Walgreen and other large employers are giving their employes choices of plans on private exchanges and financial incentives to buy the plans they can afford is good for both the company and its employes. Health insurers will have to be more price competitive, and they will force providers to help them win customers by becoming more cost effective.
 
Since WW II, employers have bought the health insurance plans that worked best for the employers, not for the workers. And they made health insurance look free, which promoted over use of primary care and preventive services that scholars now say are mostly a waste of money for the worried well, but not for those with pre-existing conditions.
 
This will complicate workers' lives. It will be welcomed by the educated who want to choose their plans instead of taking whatever is offered by their employers. But less educated folks who treat physicians as priests and do what they say will find making their big and complicated health insurance decisions difficult, if not impossible.
 
Medicare Part D has taught us how difficult it is to shop for health insurance even if you know the health insurance and health care businesses.
 
The shift of the job of buying health insurance from employers to workers  should shrink employers' health benefits administration expenses dramatically.
 
But employers may plan to put a lot of resources into teaching their workers how to shop the exchanges and evaluate the health insurance offerings. More likely, I guess, the exchanges and competing insurers will educate their customers, possibly on company time?
 
Change frightens workers. They hate it. And a major change in benefit plans will cause a lot of stress and turmoil if the changes are not managed well. Employee communications consultants will have a field day.
 
Meanwhile, insurers will have to staff up with marketing and sales staffs. Don't be surprised if you see Kaiser, Blue Cross, Aetna and other insurers' stores competing with Verizon and AT&T for the best sites in your local shopping malls. And insurers will have to advertise as never before. They may save newspapers?
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 09/17/13 at 10:01 PM
Health insuranceBuying InsurancePreventive CarePermalink

Too early to write off Gov. John Hickenlooper’s re-election

DailyCaller.com reports on a poll that shows Colorado's Gov. John Hickenlooper isn't doing as well as expected in matchups with three Republicans who want to take him on next year—Tom Tancredo, Scott Gessler and Greg Brophy.

I don't think the polls mean much at this point in the election cycle. Until we see how the Democrats' attack and demonizing machines deal with Tancredo, Gessler and Brophy and how they respond, who can say Hick is done?

Hick won in 2010 primarily because the GOP didn't have a candidate, and 20% to 30% of GOP loyalists voted for Dan Maes instead of Tancredo. I'm not sure that cost Tancredo the election, but it didn't help him or the GOP or Colorado. Tancredo ran as a third party candidate, not as a Republican.

The 2010 debates showed that Tancredo is much smarter and more politically savvy than Hick.

This year, Hick took the title of the most controversial Colorado politician away from Tancredo when he signed radical gun control bills and stayed Nathan Dunlap's execution.

Will Tancredo's strong anti-abortion, anti-gay marriage and anti-illegal views open the door for Gessler or Brophy? Can either of them raise enough money to overcome Tancredo's name recognition?

Does the Tancredo fund raising operation still have the power it had in 2010?

Will the Colorado GOP's personhood and Rick Santorum nuts control the state's convention and prevail in the state's primary? If they nominate Tancredo, will they hand the election to Hick again?

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 08/25/13 at 10:11 PM
ColoradoElections '14HickenlooperPermalink

Can Ken Buck beat Mark Udall in 2014?

Ken Buck, who lost to U.S. Senator Michael Bennet in 2010, is running for the Colorado Republican's nomination to face Sen. Mark Udall in 2014.

Can a candidate like Ken Buck who's spent most of his career in government, believes legislators, not the public, should elect U.S. senators, is a strong personhood anti-abortionist, tends to show his sexist side, foolishly backs a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, makes too many political gaffes and lost what should have been an easy win in 2010 be the #COGOP 's senate candidate in 2014?
 
An Obama and Harry Reid Democrat like Mark Udall could be beatable by a strong GOP candidate if 2014 turned out to be a GOP year in Colorado, but it is way too early to predict 2014 elections.
 
Until the GOP candidates show their stuff in the primaries, it's hard to know whether any of them can raise the big "bucks" needed to beat Udall.
 
The money primary has begun. Who will throw money down the Rick Santorum Republicans' dark hole in Colorado?
 
Will Colorado's personhood losers who are planning another divisive campaign for 2014 make it impossible for Republicans to win statewide in Colorado next year?
 
LINKS:
 
Search this blog for "Ken Buck" for my 2010 interviews with him and stories about his campaign appearances.
 
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 08/12/13 at 03:17 PM
ColoradoElections '14BuckUdallPermalink

NSA and Snowden expose corrupt, elite Washington culture

 

As Kaiser points out in "Act of Congress", the one thing members of Congress have in common is that they don't know anything but attack politics. What politicians and pundits have in common is that they need each other.

You can't survive in Washington unless you are a part of and a supporter of its corrupt, elite and power greedy culture. There is nothing worse than the greed for power, which is on full display in the NSA-Snowden story.

Americans' respect for the presidency and Congress has been in the tank since Eisenhower. What little trust in the military that existed was undermined with the appointments of Hagel as Secretary of Defense. As for national intelligence agencies, think 9/11, Boston Marathon, etc. There is no there there.

As a conservative Republican who always has given institutions and the government the benefit of the doubt until people like LBJ, Nixon, Carter, Clinton and Obama showed their true colors, the decline in trust in American institutions, including the media, is disappointing and alarming, but not a surprise.

Americans outside the beltway have 1000% better access to information than we did in the 50s, 70s and even the 90s. We've learned that all the blather that we hear on the Sunday suckup shows is coming out of the mouths of West Point C students and affirmative action and trustee Ivy League kids who know politics and little else.

If the elite don't listen to the people and respect their knowledge and assessments of what is happening in Washington, the powers of the elite will go the way of the once powerful GOP "establishment."

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 06/12/13 at 09:51 AM
EthicsTrustMediaPermalink

Why don’t Verizon, AT&T take care of “roaming” customers?

While I understand that market conditions and regulations keep Verizon and AT &T, the two biggest carriers, from covering every RV Park and city in America, I don't understand how they can leave their millions of customers in the dark when they are out of those companies' service areas. Don't they understand that free roaming is critical to keeping the millions of their customers who travel happy when they're away from home?

Verizon phones and its MIFI card don't connect in Colter Bay, WY, or West Yellowstone, MT. And the very nice West Yellowstone KOA isn't able to provide Internet connections via TengoInternet, a service used by many RV Parks. Even a dumpy little Cooke City, MT, motel we had to check into after a pass was closed due to snow had an unworkable internet as well as no Verizon. 

 

In the Fairmont RV Park at Anaconda, MT, just west of Butte, we finally got a weak Verizon MIFI signal that we both could use. 

 

All of this has been very frustrating for a political news junky like me who also is trying to keep up with the NBA playoffs and the stock, money and commodities markets.

 

When you have to do a hard shut down of your iPhones and Mi-Fi in Wyoming and Montana, you know that Verizon doesn't take care of rural America. RV park neighbors seem to be online with AT&T, and they say their phones get three bars. While three bars doesn't mean much, being able to make phone calls and get on the Internet does.

 

DW says, get used to it. You're in the boondocks and you're headed to Canada and Alaska where Internet connections will be just as bad. She's probably right.

 

Meanwhile, we're reading books and writing our journals. It's beautiful and peaceful here, and we'll enjoy it while we can.

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 06/05/13 at 02:28 PM
e-commerceQualityTechnologyPhonesVacationsPermalink

Nice when things break on day off when and where you can get good help

 

Sometimes we luck out. 

 

First, Susan's hard work put us in a wonderful RV park, the Longhorn, in Du Bois, WY, only about 200 miles from our first stop in Casper. 

 

Then, we scheduled yesterday as a day off the road. Worked out perfect. Susan turned on a tea kettle and our small electric heater on the same circuit. The GFI blew, but I had to test all the fuses, close and open circuit breaker, call Winnebago tech support and find an electrician. Tech support told me where the GFI is—below the fridge and that we probably had killed the GFI. 

 

Turns out that Randy, who maintains the park while his wife Sue holds down the phones and store, is a "universal technician." I discovered this after trying to find an RV service person in Du Bois and Jackson. After about 90 minutes, we had a new GFI working and were back in business. Randy, ever the good RV park host, refused my money, but we insisted, and he got electrician's rates. He saved us from driving to Idaho Falls or Billings, MT, or hiring a local electrician. I held the flash light.

 

The drive to Du Boise, population  1,000, from Casper, was into the wind and climbing most of the way. Thus we got only 13.8 mpg at mostly 55 to 60 mph, compared with 16.5 mpg at 66 to 69 mph before a tailwind between Denver and Casper on Tuesday. Some of Wednesday lower mileage can be attributed to our futile drive around Casper looking for a grocery store. (I had bought the wrong dressing for coleslaw.)

 

Du Boise is a nice little rural tourist spot that's waiting until mid June for the season to begin. It's been in the 50s, with some rain. Not much to do or see in this kind of weather. But we're on the fast-flowing, rather muddy flood stage Wind River, watching the sky, fling rats (Geese and goslings) and deer. 

 

I'm well into Jack London's "White Fang." Good tail. iPad makes it easy to read in the darker part of the coach.

 

Today, we're in for along, hard 65 mile trek Colter Bay, Wy.  I think we can do it.

 

LINKs:

Longhorn Ranch

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/31/13 at 11:07 AM
VacationsPermalink

Kitchen sink, glitches, otherwise a nice day

Well, our great Alaskan and Canadian adventure began this morning with a flooded kitchen sink in the house, not the RV, which is doing just fine.

 

So, after a couple visits from the plumber and a lot of last minute fiddling with the itinerary, we finally hit the road to Casper at 12:30 and hooked up the water at about 6 p.m.

 

The Reyo just pured along at about 16.5 mpg. We enjoyed a moderately strong tail wind at 66 to 69 mph in mostly 75 mph speed zones. Filled with a little over 17 gal at $3.88, or about $66 for the day's diesel guzzle.

 

We ran into about four construction zones on I-25. The big one is at I-25 and Santa Fe. The rest were 65 mph speed zones. 

 

Traffic was heavy from just south of Denver to just north of Ft. Collins. Then it was open country and wonderful. 

 

We stopped for about 40 minutes at Wyoming's new, beautiful  welcome center/museum, which is about four miles north of the Colorado border on I-25. In addition to reviewing a little Wyoming history, I picked up a bunch of brochures and "magazine" style promos as well as a great state map at the center. Don't miss this little gem.

 

Cruising Wyoming is better than passing the cows on I-80 in Nebraska. Traffic is light, views are broad and wonderful and it made me feel like I was in America, not NYC.

 

A nice surprise was that our satellite radio from Sirus/Xm worked when we turned it on. Too often, we have to call them on the phone to get a signal restored. So it was nice to  be able to listen to The Five and the Bret Bair Special Report on Fox News. As usual, we turned off Shep Smith. He specializes in hawking the news, not reporting it, imho.

 

The River RV park on the south side of Casper is only four years old. It's rest rooms and showers are big, beautiful and clean. But its Direct TV offers only Fox News and a few irrelevant channels. So I can't watch the Miami Heat v Indiana Pacers game. I'm watching delayed reports on the net.

 

Dinner was simple. Chicken sausage salad, cheese and pita and chit chat when we aren't reading.

 

As usual, Susan drove half the time and I drove half the time. At the moment, she's putting stuff away and rearranging.

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/28/13 at 08:49 PM
VacationsPermalink

Our great Alaska motorhome adventure

We've been talking about our great Alaska adventure for a couple of years and preparing for tomorrow's launch since last summer.

Of course, we're both reporters and researchers and readers. And we've been doing our homework as well as our planning even though we won't remember every tiny detail we've read and won't follow every detail of Susan's 17-page (single-spaced) plan. Memories are short and planning is a learning experience. 

We agree that when we break our plans and forget what we've read, we'll still be better off and having more fun than we would if we hadn't done our reading or planning.

So we both began our reading on RVForum.net. That's where many motorhome owners journal, blog and show pictures of their trips to Alaska from the lower 48.

Then we bought, read and still are using these guide books for RV and motorhome travelers:

1. The Milepost (2012 and 2013 editions) themilepost.com.

2. Travelers Guide to Alaskan Camping; Alaska and Yukon camping with RV or tent.

3. Guide to the Alaska Highway, 2nd ed., By Ron Dalby. http://www.menasharidge.com

4.  Brochures from TravelAlaska.com and NorthtoAlaska.com.

5. Pacific Northwest Camping Destinations; RV and car camping destinations in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia, 3rd ed., by Mike and Terri Church. rollinghomes.com.

6. Alaska & Canada's Inside Passage Cruise Tour Guide. Coastal Tour Guides, publisher. 

7. Frommer's Alaska 2011.

History books:

1. The Klondike Fever; the life and death of the last great gold rush, by Pierre Berton, 1958, Carroll & Graf Publishers, 457 pp. Fantastic, must read for history buffs.

2. Coming into the Country by John McPhee. 1997 (438 pp.)

A couple of coffee table books not worth mentioning.

Fictionalized history

1. Alaska by James Michener

2. Two Old Women, by Velma Wallis. Search web for the title to get to Amazon, Wikipedia coverage of this book. Quick, interesting read.

3. Call of the Wild, by Jack London, a Kondike gold rush survivor. I've downloaded from Amazon for $2.99 the Delphi complete works of Jack London and a collection of his short stories about Canada and Alaska. When the mood strikes me, I'll read some of the stories.

4. Tisha, a somewhat doctored autobiography of a teacher in Chicken, AK, as "told" to and embellished, etc., by Robert Specht, who didn't bother to put the teacher's name on the cover of the book. Interesting and entertaining, but online reviews make me take the story with a grain of salt.

5. Sitka, by Louis L'Amour.

Links:

RvForum.net. Go to the message board, search Alaska. You'll know our contributions when you see them.

A YouTube tour of our 2013 Itasca Reyo (T model) motorhome. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COuaZxL50Jw

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/27/13 at 05:05 PM
BooksVacationsPermalink

3 political books I’m reading: Coolidge, The three languages of politics, Act of Congress

 

Books I'll read this summer because they got good WSJ and Amazon reviews: 

Coolidge by Amity Shlaes.
 
The Three Languages of Politics by Arnold Kling.

Act of Congress: How America's Essential Institution Works, by Robert G. Kaiser.
 
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/27/13 at 05:01 PM
BooksCongress 112thPermalink

Would Tom Tancredo nomination hurt Mike Coffman, Republican’s running for Colorado General Assembly?

With former Congressman Tom Tancredo's pre-emptive announcement today that he's running for the Republican nomination for governor of Colorado, we have to ask whether his nomination would not only help Nathan Dunlap's Gov. John Hickenlooper, but also hurt Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CD 6) win re-election over former state House Speaker Andy Romanoff in 2014?

And will Tancredo discourage strong, electable Republicans from running not only for governor, but also for attorney general, secretary of state, state treasurer and the state's General Assembly?

Coffman is in a tough race against Romanoff who is a smart, politically talented guy in a district that Democrats have Gerrymandered just for him.

Colorado's House GOP gave away control of that body in 2012 by blocking a civil unions bill that enraged Obama Democrats. 

Nathan Dunlap's Gov. Hickenlooper, who also is anti- guns and a tax and spend Obama Democrat, is looking more vulnerable every day. 

But if the corrupt GOP caucus system allows Rick Santorum Republicans nominate Tancredo and like-minded social issues extremists,  Hickenlooper may think that he's already been re-elected and that he is invulnerable.

With Tancredo's early announcement, he not only pre-empts State Sen. Greg Brophy, who reportedly is also considering running, he also is giving Obama Democrats all the amunition they need to recruit strong candidates to run for the state's House and Senate in 2014.

Because 2014 still is so far off, a lot can happen. So it's way too early to predict what will happen. But it's not too early to start vetting candidates and asking questions.

Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/23/13 at 04:56 PM
ColoradoElections '14CoffmanRomanoffTancredoPermalink

Tom Tancredo announces for 2014 run for governor of Colorado; Nathan Dunlap Hickenlooper vulnerable

Former Rep. Tom Tancredo (CD-6) just announced that he is running for governor of Colorado in 2014.

And "Nathan Dunlap" Hickenlooper's temporary clemency for Dunlap who was scheduled for execution for killing four people 20 years ago makes the otherwise popular governor a lot more vulnerable than he was a few days ago. Indeed, John Hickenlooper has been making hard left decisions with the newly empowered and over-reaching Democrats who control the state's General Assembly.

So Hickenlooper is very vulnerable if the Rick Santorum Republicans in the state nominate a heavy-weight, non extremist candidate for governor, which seems a bit unlikely at this point.

 

I covered a couple of dozen or so appearances by Tom Tancredo during his save-the-GOP-form-itself-campaign against John Hickenlooper in 2010 for my blog.
 
In short, Tancredo's long experience in the Colorado General Assembly, the Education Dept. under Reagan and in Congress prepared him to be a strong, smart governor of Colorado, but. . ..
 
He is a Rick Santorum Republican and is considered by independents and the  Left as an extremist on abortion, gay marriages and illegal immigration and immigration.  He's also considered a traitor by some hard core Dan Maes Republicans who helped elect John Hickenlooper in the first place.
 
But he's pretty popular with a lot of Republicans in the state.
 
Unfortunately for Tancredo, Republicans are only about a third of registered voters in the state, and they can't elect anyone by themselves.
 
Because of Tancredo's extremism on social issues, I think I would have a hard time backing him. State Sen. Greg Brophy, who reportedly also is considering running against HIck is very sharp and has been working the social media to increase his name recognition. I think a lot of Republicans will give him a hard look.
 
Scott Gessler is a smart, honest secretary of state, but I don't think he's as politically talented as Tancredo or Brophy. Hick would easily beat Gessler, I'm thinking.
 
There is no question, however, that Nathan Dunlap Hickenlooper may be beatable as an Obama Democrat in 2014 despite his pretty high poll ratings. The guy has spent this year arming the GOP for the next election.
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/23/13 at 03:48 PM
ColoradoElections '14Permalink

Tom Tancredo will run for governor of Colorado in 2014; Nathan Dunlap’s John Hickenlooper vulnerable

Former Rep. Tom Tancredo (CD-6) just announced that he is running for governor of Colorado in 2014.

And "Nathan Dunlap" Hickenlooper's temporary clemency for Dunlap who was scheduled for execution for killing four people 20 years ago makes the otherwise popular governor a lot more vulnerable than he was a few days ago. Indeed, John Hickenlooper has been making hard left decisions with the newly empowered and over-reaching Democrats who control the state's General Assembly.

So Hickenlooper is very vulnerable if the Rick Santorum Republicans in the state nominate a heavy-weight, non extremist candidate for governor, which seems a bit unlikely at this point.

I covered a couple of dozen or so appearances by Tom Tancredo during his save-the-GOP-form-itself-campaign against John Hickenlooper in 2010 for this blog. Search the blog for "Tancredo". I took my videos of his apperances down when I closed my YouTube account because of the privacy intrusions by its owner, Google (GOOG).

 
In short, Tancredo's long experience in the Colorado General Assembly, the Education Dept. under Reagan and in Congress prepared him to be a strong, smart governor of Colorado, but. . ..
 
He is a Rick Santorum Republican and is considered by independents and the  Left as an extremist on abortion, gay marriages and illegal immigration and immigration.  He's also considered a traitor by some hard core Dan Maes Republicans who helped elect John Hickenlooper in the first place.
 
But he's pretty popular with a lot of Republicans in the state.
 
Unfortunately for Tancredo, Republicans are only about a third of registered voters in the state, and they can't elect anyone by themselves.
 
Because of Tancredo's extremism on social issues, I think I would have a hard time backing him. State Sen. Greg Brophy, who reportedly also is considering running against HIck is very sharp and has been working the social media to increase his name recognition. I think a lot of Republicans will give him a hard look.
 
Scott Gessler is a smart, honest secretary of state, but I don't think he's as politically talented as Tancredo or Brophy. Hick would easily beat Gessler, I'm thinking.
 
There is no question, however, that Nathan Dunlap Hickenlooper may be beatable as an Obama Democrat in 2014 despite his pretty high poll ratings. The guy has spent this year arming the GOP for the next election.
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 05/23/13 at 03:48 PM
ColoradoElections '14HickenlooperTancredoPermalink
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