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Articles by Donald E. L. Johnson

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Scott McInnis: Don’t sell Electronic Arts game that lets players ‘kill’ American troops

 

Under the First Amendment, Americans can say and do stupid and offensive things, including disrespecting our troops, flags and religions, but they do so knowing that by offending most Americans, they put their reputations and futures at risk.
 
Electronic Arts is a publicly-traded company that is struggling against new competitors on the internet, and its management apparently is so desperate that it is willing to sell a game that lets players "kill" American troops and their allies in Afghanistan. 

 

You can't get more disgusting or offensive than that. 
 
Former U.S. Rep. Scott McInnis and Bently Rayburn, a retired U.S. Air Force general, have sent this letter to the Colorado Retailers Assn. The letter asks retailers to not sell the game, "Medal of Honor." By so doing, McInnis and Rayburn risk giving the game free publicity. Retailers like Walmart, Target and others, of course, will listen to their customers. Utimately, Electronic Arts will sell the game online, if not in retail stores.
 
The letter follows:
 
<blockquote>September 30, 2010
 
Mr. Christopher Howes
President
Colorado Retailers Association
1580 Lincoln Avenue
Denver, Colorado
 
Dear Christopher,
 
In recent weeks Electronic Arts, a-for profit video game developer, announced the latest version of their “Medal of Honor” video game.  The game is set in modern Afghanistan and allows a player to pretend to be a Taliban fighter and shoot and kill US troops. This is a complete disgrace and out of respect to our troops no retailer in Colorado should sell it.
 
In October, this game is scheduled to go on sale throughout Colorado and the entire country. The controversy over the game has resulted in US military installations throughout the world banning its sale in their post and base exchanges.  British Defense Secretary Liam Fox said last month that he was “disgusted and angry” by what was a “tasteless product.” Secretary Fox called on retailers to show their support for the troops by not selling the game.
 
The Medal of Honor is the highest honor that can be earned by our soldiers.  Many times it is awarded after a soldier has given his or her life for our nation. For this game to come onto the market at this time with while American servicemen and women are paying for our freedom with their lives is particularly offensive.
Officials of Electronic Arts Corporation should also rethink selling this video game.  In their quest for profit, can these officials look into the eyes of those who have lost loved ones serving our country in Afghanistan with a clear conscious? Where is the respect for our soldiers? 
 
The Colorado Retailers Association should come out with a strong public statement denouncing this product and urging all member retail outlets to refuse to carry such an offensive and vulgar product.
 
We look forward to your response.
 
Sincerely,
 
Scott McInnis                                                                                  Bentley Rayburn
US Congressman Retired                                                                 US Air Force General Retired</blockquote>
                            
Posted by Donald E. L. Johnson on 09/30/2010 at 04:34 PM

Ethics

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